Horticulture, Forestry and Recreation Resources
Park Management
Park Management and Conservation

Wise management of the nation's natural and recreational resources results in significant ecological, medical, economic and cultural benefits to the citizenry and their guests.   Use of these primarily public spaces for recreation often results in life changing and virtually always life enriching experiences for those involved...a desired outcome of notable value.

Optimally balancing use and protection of these scare resources is particularly challenging and requires the best efforts of dedicated professionals.   Award winning PMC faculty are committed to providing the highest level of professional training in meeting these challenges.

The PMC (park management and conservation)  curriculum prepares students for careers as professionals in a variety of natural resource management agencies and organizations.  Most employment opportunities are in the public sector, including such agencies as the National Park Service, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the USDA Forest Service, state park departments, and city and county park and recreation departments. There are also positions with associations, resorts, concessionaires, retailers and various other enterprises. 

Graduates are employed as park managers, rangers, conservation officers, planners, naturalists, agency and unit directors and in other areas recreation and natural resource management.



 
The Park Management and Conservation Curriculum at Kansas State University is proud to be accredited by the Council on Accreditation of Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Related Professions, and has been since 1988.  The program will be reviewed for re-accreditation during the spring of 2015.  Less than 90 curriculums in the nation share this status.  As of 2013, the program hosted 99 students enrolled and graduates approximately 24 students each year. 

Recognizing that there may be degree/accreditation mills in existence, Kansas State University is pleased to provide the following information for the discerning reader so they can clearly determine the difference between a degree mill and a fully accredited curriculum like the Park Management and Conservation Program at KSU.
 
Important Information Regarding Degree Mills and the Value of Accreditation

Please watch this important video regarding degree and accreditation mills.  According to CHEA, "Degree mills and accreditation mills mislead and harm. In the United States, degrees and certificates from mills may not be acknowledged by other institutions when students seek to transfer or go to graduate school. Employers may not acknowledge degrees and certificates from degree mills when providing tuition assistance for continuing education. “Accreditation” from an accreditation mill can mislead students and the public about the quality of an institution. In the presence of degree mills and accreditation mills, students may spend a good deal of money and receive neither an education nor a useable credential."  Read more on CHEA's website.
 
CHEA defines accreditation as "the primary means of assuring and improving the quality of higher education institutions and programs in the United States. Active for the past 100 years, this private, voluntary system of self-examination and peer review has been central to the creation of a U.S. higher education enterprise that is outstanding in many respects."  Read more about the Value of Accreditation.
 
 
 
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Stacy Jensen
Park & Rec>Stacey Jensen.jpg
Stacy Jensen, graduate from KSU's Park Management and Conservation program, describes her job responsibilities as Park Interpreter for Sesquicentennial State Park in South Carolina.